First Wave of Regional Protection Force to Deploy to South Sudan Within Weeks

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FILE - Displaced people are passed by a United Nations vehicle while walking towards a U.N. camp in Malakal, South Sudan, Dec. 30, 2013.

The outgoing United Nations undersecretary general for peacekeeping operations said Tuesday that he expects to see the first wave of a regional protection force to arrive in South Sudan within the next few weeks.

“We are sparing no effort in speeding up, and in the next few weeks you will see the first vanguard of the regional force being deployed here in Juba. And I think that will be a very important signal to know that things are moving ahead,” Herve Ladsous said.

Ladsous, who is in Juba on his final visit to South Sudan as the U.N.’s top peacekeeping boss, said the Kiir administration must first silence the guns if a national dialogue is going to work.

Ladsous visited the South Sudanese capital this week along with his successor, Jean-Pierre Lacroix, to meet with President Salva Kiir and other top officials.

FILE - Herve Ladsous, head of the U.N. Department of Peacekeeping Operations, speaks to Security Council representatives in New York, Oct.14, 2014.

FILE – Herve Ladsous, head of the U.N. Department of Peacekeeping Operations, speaks to Security Council representatives in New York, Oct.14, 2014.

Ladsous described security and humanitarian conditions in South Sudan as dire. He said the situation requires a political solution and that the national dialogue Kiir proposed in December is not a solution to South Sudan’s problems. The dialogue was supposed to begin early this month, according to Kiir, but a start date has yet to be identified by the government.

“A national dialogue, of course, is most useful held in the context where hostilities had ceased, that there is no more fighting first. Second, that the humanitarian context is not as bad as right now. You know, when people are concerned about their basic livelihoods maybe they don’t have so much time to spare for political dialogue,” Ladsous said.

Ladsous said the government must drive the national dialogue toward a “great consensus,” saying it can be a catalyst for peace. At the same time, he warns that open dialogue is not a substitute for a political solution to end the fighting that continues to grip the country.

In his final visit to Juba, Ladsous — who steps down in 10 days — urged all sides to implement the 2015 peace agreement, noting the U.N. is not pleased that it’s been all but ignored.

The U.N. peacekeeping chief said the country’s warring parties continue to block aid workers from accessing people in need of humanitarian assistance.

“We have faced a number of impediments in terms of freedom of movement, in terms of getting clearances. Very importantly, the humanitarian actors have been severely impeded in their action on the ground,” Ladsous said.

Ladsous said South Sudan is one of those countries around the world where there is a high incidence of humanitarian workers being prevented from doing their work, and where workers are killed while trying to help the most needy.

He said the African Union, the United Nations and other stakeholders of the 2015 peace deal continue to try to engage the warring parties to end the fighting and fully implement the agreement.

Ladsous said when he arrives in New York later this week, he will attend another meeting on the status of regional protection force deployments, which he called “very important.”

The forces will consist of several units from Rwanda, Nepal, Bangladesh and Ethiopia, among other countries.

©VOA

1 COMMENT

  1. Subject: First Wave of Regional Protection Force to Deploy to South Sudan Within Weeks
    Mar 22, 201

    Commentary 23 mar 2017
    1. Quotation:“And I think that will be a very important signal to know that things are moving ahead,”
    Herve Ladsous said.”

    Comment:‘things are moving ahead” in Africa!!! In what direction? — a sincere one, who cares for Africa, may ask.

    2. Quotation: “Ladsous, who is in Juba on his final visit to South Sudan as the U.N.’s top peacekeeping boss, said the Kiir administration must first silence the guns if a national dialogue is
    going to work.”

    Comment: Is this newly invented art of political solution that Africans cannot or are not aware of?

    3. Quotation: Ladsous visited the South Sudanese capital this week along with his successor,
    Jean-Pierre Lacroix, to meet with President Salva Kiir and other top officials.

    Comment: Can’t this be done by indigenous African Diplomats and/or African specialized Experts ?

    4. Quotation: “Ladsous described security and humanitarian conditions in South Sudan as dire”.

    Comment: Does Africa need high fluting expert from the UN to say the obvious?

    5. Quotation: “He said the situation requires a political solution …. “

    Comment: Isn’t that obvious? Does Africa require an expert from the UN to say the obvious?

    6. Quotation “:when people are concerned about their basic livelihoods maybe they don’t have so
    much time to spare for political dialogue,” Ladsous said.”

    Comment: Wow! Just give them “basic livelihood” and the Africans would be happy, for eternity!

    7. Quotation: “ Ladsous said the government must drive the national dialogue toward a “great
    consensus,” saying it can be a catalyst for peace. At the same time, he warns that open dialogue is not a substitute for a political solution to end the fighting that continues to grip the country.”

    Comment: Is this a new lesson for Africans?

    8. Quotation: “In his final visit to Juba, Ladsous — who steps down in 10 days — urged all
    sides to implement the 2015 peace agreement, noting the U.N. is not pleased that it’s been all but ignored.”

    Comment: “the UN is not pleased”!!! One can’t help conjuring that Africans would be shivering out of guilt for not abiding by the dictates of the ‘Big Brother’.

    9. Quotation: “The U.N. peacekeeping chief said the country’s warring parties continue to block aid workers from accessing people in need of humanitarian assistance.”

    Comment: And what is the UN going to do about it?

    10. Quotation: “We have faced a number of impediments in terms of freedom of movement, in terms of getting clearances. Very importantly, the humanitarian actors have been severely impeded in their action on the ground, Ladsous said.”

    Comment: The honourable UN Representative laments that “the humanitarian actors” were not doing their ‘acting’ freely (with respect?) while millions of South Sudan people, after thirty – forty years of struggle to achieve basic foundation of humanity are still not taken seriously with respect. For heaven’s sake, where is the balance or the morality of comparison? A few “humanitarian actors are severely impeded in their action on the ground” while millions of South Sudan people have perished and the remaining are starving to death.
    Africa does not need delinquent ‘actors’; it needs African indigenous scholars to roll their sleeves up and lift Africa from the gutter.

    11. Quotation: “ Ladsous said South Sudan is one of those countries around the world where
    There is a high incidence of humanitarian workers being prevented from doing their work, and where workers are killed while trying to help the most needy.”

    Comment: The “most needy” people referred to are dignified Africans who are struggling to come out free from the inherent cruel and inhuman effect of past colonialism that no amount of pages in the anal of human history can adequately describe the crime perpetrated by the so-called ‘civilized’ people !

    12. Quotation: “He said the African Union, the United Nations and other stakeholders of the 2015 peace deal continue to try to engage the warring parties to end the fighting and fully implement the agreement.”

    Comment: It is a superfluous and artificial advice. The African people are not blind to see what is going on in their back yard, so to say. Africa has a mammoth problem; and Africans are fully cognizant of that fact.

    13. Quotation: “Ladsous said when he arrives in New York later this week, he will attend another meeting on the status of regional protection force deployments, which he called “very important.”

    Comment: One can’t help being cynical >>> yes, more meetings; more per diem; more lavish receptions; more opportunity to secure advisory job after retirement for eternity….. at the expense of the ‘backward’, ‘poor’, African .people.

    14. Quotation: “The forces will consist of several units from Rwanda, Nepal, Bangladesh and Ethiopia, among other countries.

    Comment: That is supposed to satisfy the Africans and the Asians ‘among other countries’ and the game goes on, and on, and on ………while Africans openly slide down, and down, and down, losing their Dear Africa to hungry nations for SPACE and for eternal richness out of enviable Natural Resources of the ‘Dark Continent’. THE END

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