South Sudan violence is ‘tribal genocide’

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South Sudan’s violent conflict is now genocide being perpetrated along tribal lines, a British official says, urging foreign leaders to do more to force the country’s government to end it.

Priti Patel, the UK secretary of state for international development, says there are “massacres taking place, people’s throats being slit” amid what she calls a “scorched-earth policy” in the world’s youngest country.

Patel visited South Sudan this week, where she met South Sudan President Salva Kiir, whose government is accused of blocking food aid to some areas.

Villages were being burned down, women were being raped and food was being used as a weapon of war, Patel said on Wednesday in neighbouring Uganda, where she visited some of the settlements housing more than 800,000 South Sudanese refugees.

Thousands continue to flee South Sudan amid increasing reports of ethnic killings by mostly government forces.

“It’s tribal, it’s absolutely tribal, so on that basis it’s genocide,” she said.

“Other leaders in the region cannot sit on their hands here. They themselves have to call on President Kiir to do more.”

A United Nations report released in March says South Sudan is experiencing ethnic cleansing by mostly government forces and their allies.

©AP

1 COMMENT

  1. Subject: South Sudan violence is ‘tribal genocide’, Apr 13, 2017

    Commentary: 13 April 2017
    It is interesting article. What do we get out of it? Does it say anything that we can glean something worthy out of it? Let us see.

    1). The title itself.
    Reaction: Yes, it is tribal genocide. But, is it something new to Africa? It is a sad fact that we have been at it for years.

    2). “a British official says, urging foreign leaders to do more to force the country’s government end it.”
    Reaction: Let us be honest. Historically, ‘foreign leaders” have done horrendous damage to Africa than anything else. To suggest that ‘foreign leaders’ should force the African governments is tantamount of saying the indigenous people (including, of course, the highly educated Africans) are helpless to do anything by themselves, for themselves. It is an insult; though, we can hardly deny it completely!

    3). “ there are “massacres taking place, people’s throats being slit” … a “scorched-earth policy” in the world’s youngest country.”
    Reaction: Yes, atrocities have been committed in the country – and no doubt the African people in general, the African highly educated sector in particular, and the Honourable African Union itself is aware of what is going on in South Sudan. Do they really need a reminder from a foreign secretary of state? The implication is devastating.

    4). “Villages were being burned down, women were being raped and food was being used as a weapon of war ….in the settlements housing more than 800,000 South Sudanese refugees.”
    Reaction: Again, yes, we know. So, what are WE AFRICANS gaining (learning) out of foreign visitors’ wisdom? Why is it that WE AFRICANS are insensitive to such tragedies in our own backyard? Do we really need ‘foreigners’ (mostly past colonizers who, in the first place, created the havoc in African Life) to tell us what is GOOD and BAD in Life and how to govern our selves? A little note: I am absolutely in favour of foreign visitors to Africa, with loaded pockets to boost the economy of the Continent but not to emaciate Africa out of its natural beauty and treasure.

    5). “Other leaders in the region cannot sit on their hands here. They themselves have to call on President Kiir to do more.”
    Reaction: WHAT!!!??? “President Kiir to do more” ???!!! He is already glaringly doing what he wants to do – and the result is ugly and crime of the highest order. As to the “leaders in the region …sitting on their hands”, the African proverb says it all, I think (sorry for the clumsy translation): “it is the consolation not to cry that makes me cry even more”. Let me personalize it, as a way of clarification: I know my weakness, so I cry; and a close friend consoles me not to cry ; and yet it makes me cry, even more[1]

    6). “A United Nations report released in March says South Sudan is experiencing ethnic cleansing by mostly government forces and their allies.”
    Reaction: Africa does not need strings of UN Reports to know what is going on in their Continent. But, we all know very well what those reports are good for. Don’t we? Africa becomes a convenient tool for the benefit of highly paid external international civil servants around the Globe in various institutions — writing/modifying reports. Let us not deceive each other! Africa — though mindful of the interdependent world — can only have meaningful life by itself, on its own terms. Are the so-called “educated” Africans up to the challenge? That is the BIG question – for Africa. The rest of the world has already etched its own image of Africans – permanently

    7). Conclusion: What did we gain out of the visitor’s commentary/advisory? Honestly, nothing. In any case, we must realize we are on our own. We must realize that no one can truly help Africa than its own sons and daughters. We must realize that without unity of purpose we can never reach anywhere. It is up to us; our pettiness can only make us pettier. THE END
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    Footnote [1] In Humanity Class, that I have gone through physically (not mentally) they call it TRAGEDY and I think there was a character (perhaps European) related to the play or which goes with it. As they say: ‘Adio’ to my ‘modern’ education!

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